Dew-Fer-Ol: A don’t for all

by Mike

dew-fer-ol

Five pieces of advice to the New York-area physicians of 1914:

1. Don’t prescribe a medicine made by a South Jersey winery.

2. Don’t prescribe a medicine that was created on the principle of “Two great tastes that taste great together”.

3. Don’t prescribe a medicine whose ads give no clue of what condition it should be prescribed for. (Anemia, presumably. Though that doesn’t explain the olive oil.)

4. Don’t prescribe tincture of iron citro-chloride. Particularly in acidic mixtures, it will break down to ferric chloride, which is poisonous. (Source: Merck Report (October 1915), Volume 24, page 244)

5. You probably have some patients who want to drink wine but have been pressured by the temperance movement to think it’s wrong unless a doctor prescribes it. Just prescribe wine, instead of some weird substance. 25 ounces of port wine would probably be cheaper than a bottle of Dew-Fer-Ol.

* * *

Source: Long Island Medical Journal Advertiser (1914), Volume 8, page xxix, which is at the very end of the PDF available here.

What exactly is “Tinct. Citro Chlor. Iron”? I think this is it (excerpt from the American Pharmaceutical Association’s National Formulary, Fourth Edition (1916), page 225).

tinctura-ferri-citro-chloridi

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